Question Need advice for Coconut Vs Tamarind tree farm

sivasp

New Member
Hi,
I have 5 acres of land in Erode Dt, Tamil Nadu with 2 wells and 2 borewell. I am planing to convert this to either coconut farm or TAMARIND (PKM 1) farm.

As i stay outside of the farm and have very limited access to labor force for any agri work, i need advise to choose either one.

Also, please share with me information about profit and market for Tamarind.

Thank you.
With regards
 

shanmuga06

Active Member
Ttamarind cultivation

The tamarind cultivation is better than coconut cultivation.Because tamarind will survive at any circumstances.But coconut cultivation will requires nearly minimum 100 litres water per tree per day.But this will not applicable for tamarind .Minimum three litres per tamarind tree is sufficient .Less labour will manage the tamarind garden.But its not possible in coconut garden.The investment for coconut plantations will be more when comparing with the tamarind.
For more details plz contact us:

A Sivakumar
Priya Nursery Garden
KARAIKUDI-630001,TN
9843080275
priyagar06@yahoo.co.in
 

manojsinghchandel

New Member
Tamarind Market and Uses

Tamarind Market and Uses

Tamarind pulp is used in numerous culinary preparations. It is also a raw material for the preparation of wine like beverages. Seeds are taken out of Tamarind manually with the help of a sharp knife. Tamarind seed is very strong and is covered with a black-brown hull/husk. The villagers collect and sell these raw seeds to the merchants in their nearest town who store the seeds in their go down and sell in the market. The average crop size of Tamarind kernel seeds is 100,000 tons per year. Major part of this goes to cattle feed industry within India. The seeds are de-husked, broken, cleaned and ground to obtain Tamarind Kernel Powder.

Uses & Applications of Tamarind Kernel Powder

TEXTILE INDUSTRY:

Sizing: TKP is an ideal sizing material and is extensively used for sizing in textile industry.

Thickener: One of the biggest use of TKP in the international market is as a textile thickener. Many companies modify TKP in order to have better results in specific end uses.

JUTE INDUSTRY:

TKP is extensively used in sizing jute yarns. Gradually it has replaced all other conventional starches in this industry. It is also used for sizing in cotton wraps.

OTHER USES:

Soil Stabiliser: TKP can be used along with other chemicals for stabilising soil, earth or clay. The stabilised mixture can also be moulded into strong bricks.

Explosives: TKP is used in the Explosives industry.

Plywood Glue: TKP is used in making adhesives for making plywood.

Paper adhesives: TKP mixed with other chemicals can make high quality paper adhesives.

Regds
 

sivasp

New Member
Hi all,
Please advice me the spacing requirement for PKM1 TAMARIND.

Thank you.
With regards
Siva
 

sampadafarms

New Member
About PKM 1-Tamarind

7QUOTE=sivasp;163420]Hi all,
Please advice me the spacing requirement for PKM1 TAMARIND.

Thank you.
With regards
Siva[/QUOTE]

Dear Mr. Siva,


THE TAMARIND (Tamarindus indica) is a hardy tree well adapted to the semi-arid tropics.

This economically important tree is ideal for farm-forestry in the drought-prone regions. It is popularly referred to as indian dates.

The tamarind tree can serve as an insurance crop and a "pension crop" for the farmers in the dry belts.

A few promising early-bearing varieties with high yield potential and attractive fruit qualities are now available for the growers.

Some of the most popular varieties in the south are "PKM-1", "Pradishtan" and "Origam".

The grafted plants of these high-yielding varieties are being grown by several farmers in Tamil Nadu either as isolated trees or in commercially viable groves in dry tracts.

Tamarind comes up well in a wide range of soils in varied agro-climatic zones in the southern peninsula.

The improved grafts are ideal for commercial plantation as they commence bearing from the fourth year of planting.

Their yield is also quite high. For instance, "PKM-1" has an average yield of 263.3 kg of fruits per tree in a year compared to 165 kg of fruits per tree by the traditional varieties.

From the fifth year, "PKM-1" can yield about 50 kg of fruits per tree per year, and the yields from the tenth year will be above 250 kg a year. From 250 kg of fruits, roughly 80 kg of tamarind pulp can be extracted.

The improved varieties are ideally suited for high density planting following the hexagonal (or triangular) method of planting, which will accommodate more number of trees in a unit area.

A spacing of 7 m by 7 m has been recommended for commercial planting, and about 200 trees will be enough to cover a hectare.

The young and robust grafts from a reliable source should be used for planting. Pits of 75 cm by 75 cm by 75 cm are to be dug and filled with ripe organic manure at the time of planting.

Planting should be done in September-October when there is sufficient moisture in the soil. In the initial stages of growth, the plants may need some watering especially during the hot summer months.

Small quantities of vermi-compost fortified with some beneficial microorganisms such as Trichoderma viride, Psuedomonas and vesicular arbuscular mycrorhiza (VAM) will prove to be highly beneficial and rewarding. The tree is not attacked by many pests and diseases. When established well in the soil with their extensive and expansive root system, the plants do not need watering at all.

The trees should, however, be given adequate nutrition through enriched organic composts once a year, and earthed up around the base of the trunk. Care should be taken to nip off the flowers in the first three years.

Tamarind allows intercropping with a variety of annual crops. Vegetables and legumes can be grown in the interspaces in the first four to five years to augment farm income and add soil fertility. Once fully established, the trees will ensure regular income to the grower even when other annual crops fail at times of protracted drought.


Regards
Raghu Ram

Dear Mr. Siva, Contact us for supply of true line plants of PKM 1 tamarind also. We can deliver the plants to your Erode farm.

Regards
Raghu Ram
 
Last edited:

sivasp

New Member
Hi Raghu,
The space of 5m beteen trees looks kind of very near. could you please reconfirm.

Thanks,
Regards

siva
 

sampadafarms

New Member
PKM i tamaring-Sampada Farms

Hi Raghu,
The space of 5m beteen trees looks kind of very near. could you please reconfirm.

Thanks,
Regards

siva
Or u can plant by 7m X 7m distance. In this pattern, u can accommodate 204 plants in an hectare (around 80 plants in an acre). Comfortably u can adopt this system of distance. For plants also you can contact us.

Regards
Raghu Ram
 

balamuraliv

New Member
Mr.Raghu,

We are from Madurai- Tamilnadu, wanted to buy 300 Tamarind PKM 1 plants.Kindly provide the details of supply and price.

Regards
Bala
 

blkbasava

New Member
Can we have Tamarind as intercrop/2nd layer crop along with coconut? I want to plant tamarind along with coconut for my 2 acre plot near Chitradurga karnataka. Locally people are telling to plant tamarind only on borders, do we have any reasons?
 

vrikshaay

Member
Tamarind is a high foraging efficient tree, with vein-nerve type roots spread similar to Bamboo and its roots spread very far all around the tree. So, it will not all allow (or not possible for other plants to grow) as Tamarind's nerve type root system will take away all the nutrients from soil with nothing left to others, except in forest conditions where other trees/plants grows under Tamarind tree because there will be more than sufficient nutrients in the soil even after high rate foraging by Tamarind roots. So, it is only a traditional farming knowledge that nothing will grow under Tamarind in normal farm conditions. There are no normal companion crops for Tamarind. Coconut tree planted along with Tamarind will starve and die once the Tamarind tree reaches 5-10 ft height and its roots spread become very wide and intense.
 

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