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Thread: Tamarind Juice , Powder processing plant / unit

  1. #1 Tamarind Juice , Powder processing plant / unit 

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    Aug 2005
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    Dear Sir / Madam,

    I would like to know about "Tamarind pulp juice, Tamarind powder" procecssing unit / plant. Can any one of you give relaible consultant name to me to get the details of the project or i request consutants to write to my mail id (smukther@rediffmail.com.) to get my clear requirement and size of the project etc.

    Looking forward to listen from all of you.

    With regards.

    Shaik.Mukther.
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  2. #2  
    kirti s's Avatar
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    Hello Sir

    Mr. P. P. Madappa
    ABC International
    402, Commerce House, 9/1, Cunningham Road
    Bangalore - 560 052, Karnataka, India
    Phone: +(91)-(80)-22252526 / 22203977 / 22203997
    Fax: +(91)-(80)-22251022
    Mobile: +(91)-9341249711 / 9845034633
    Email: ppmadappa@dataone.in, abci2003@yahoo.com

    Contact Person Mr. Piyush Vora
    Address B/3 , Amizara , Mamlatdar wadi Main Road, Malad ( West ),
    Mumbai- 400 001, Maharashtra (INDIA)
    Phone +(91)-(22)-(22)- 2880 60 23
    Fax +(91)-(22)-(22)-2880 49 28
    Mobile 0 98204 37933 / 098203 37900
    E-mail vimaltkp@rediffmail.com

    Sri Venkateswara Food Processing Pvt. Ltd.,
    N P Road,
    Nidadavole - 534303,
    West Godavari District,
    Andhra Pradesh, INDIA


    Admin center:
    Sri Venkateswara Food Processing Pvt. Ltd.,
    # 6, Nandanam,
    Nizampet Road, Kukatpally,
    Hyderabad 500 072,
    Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Mobile: +91-98-6666-6789

    E.mail: info@tamarinds.com
    krishna@tamarinds.com

    Hello Sir u can contact the above concerned for your help
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  3. #3  

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    Hello Kirti S,

    Thanks a lot for your support.


    with regards.


    Shaik.Mukther.
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  4. #4  

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    Dear Sir

    You can contact the below address for projects on processing unit

    National Institute of Industrial Research (NIIR),
    106-E, Kamla Nagar,
    New Delhi-110007,
    niir@vsnl.com

    For purchasing and consultancy you can contact

    Aum Consultancy Pvt. Ltd. ( An ISO-9001 Company )
    Mr. Shashi Kumar
    89, Santhome High Road
    Chennai - 600 028, Tamil Nadu, India
    Tel : +(91)-(44)- 24643826 / 24957220
    Fax : +(91)-(44)-24951217
    Email : info@aumconsultancy.com

    Regards
    Surya Narmada
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  5. #5  
    kirti s's Avatar
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    Hello Sir

    TAMARIND POWDER

    Tamarind is traditionally used in its pulp form and is being used in almost all the households in India. Bulk of the tamarind is produced in the states of Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Orissa and to a limited extent in Bihar, Maharashtra and Karnataka. The Tamarind pulp commonly used is not well cleaned. Tamarind pulp can be easily converted to its powder form to make it a convenient product with the advantage of ease of handling, transportation and storage. The tamarind powder is having all the qualities of pulp. It is a hygienically prepared product. The technology for processing of raw tamarind pulp into dry powder form has been developed by CFTRI. Tamarind powder can be used as a condiment/adjunct and souring agent in preparations like sambar, rasam, puliyogare, chutney and sauce. As a convenient product, it has got a good market potential. The units for production of tamarind powder can be well established in rural area.
    The process is simple. Tamarind pulp obtained from the trade is cleaned deseeded and fibre removed. The pulp is then processed under standardised conditions of temperature, humidity and mill setting. The powder is then packed in HDPE pouches of desired size. The by-product from the unit is Tamarind seed from which Tamarind Seed/Kernal powder can be obtained.

    Tray drier, pulversier and sealing machines are essentially needed equipments.

    Estimated project cost:

    Capacity of the unit : 100 kg/day

    Building : 75 M2

    Equipment : Rs.1,50,000

    Working Capital ( 1 month) : Rs.75,000

    Utilities per day:

    Manpower : 6 Nos.

    Power : 9 KW

    Water : 2,000 litres

    For manufacturers/Suppliers of relevant equipments and gadgets, refer

    1.D.P. Pulvarisers, Nagindas Master Road Behind Museum, Fort, Bombay

    2.Sri Venkateswara Industries, C-37 Yadavagiri Industrial Estate, Mysore-570002



    Kirti
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  6. #6  

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    Dear All,


    Thanks for ur valueble inputs.


    With regards.

    Shaik.Mukther.
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  7. #7  
    kirti s's Avatar
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    hello
    The food uses of the tamarind are many. The tender, immature, very sour pods are cooked as seasoning with rice, fish and meats in India. The fully-grown, but still unripe fruits, called "swells" in the Bahamas, are roasted in coals until they burst and the skin is then peeled back and the sizzling pulp dipped in wood ashes and eaten. The fully ripe, fresh fruit is relished out-of-hand by children and adults, alike. The dehydrated fruits are easily recognized when picking by their comparatively light weight, hollow sound when tapped and the cracking of the shell under gentle pressure. The shell lifts readily from the pulp and the lengthwise fibers are removed by holding the stem with one hand and slipping the pulp downward with the other. The pulp is made into a variety of products. It is an important ingredient in chutneys, curries and sauces, including some brands of Worcestershire and barbecue sauce, and in a special Indian seafood pickle called "tamarind fish". Sugared tamarind pulp is often prepared as a confection. For this purpose, it is desirable to separate the pulp from the seeds without using water. If ripe, fresh, undehydrated tamarinds are available, this may be done by pressing the shelled and defibered fruits through a colander while adding powdered sugar to the point where the pulp no longer sticks to the fingers. The seeded pulp is then shaped into balls and coated with powdered sugar. If the tamarinds are dehydrated, it is less laborious to layer the shelled fruits with granulated sugar in a stone crock and bake in a moderately warm oven for about 4 hours until the sugar is melted, then the mass is rubbed through a sieve, mixed with sugar to a stiff paste, and formed into patties.

    Tamarind seeds have been used in a limited way as emergency food. They are roasted, soaked to remove the seedcoat, then boiled or fried, or ground to a flour or starch. Roasted seeds are ground and used as a substitute for, or adulterant of, coffee.


    Kirti
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