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Thread: Brahmi- profitable medicinal crop

  1. #1 Brahmi- profitable medicinal crop 

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    Sep 2005
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    Dear Friends,

    Bramhi is one the the most demanded medicinal crop in the world maket.So, here I m giving cultivation aspact of it.

    B.N. BACOPA MONNIERI (L) PENNEL
    FAMILY - SCROPHULARIACEAE

    A creeping succulent herb branches profusely and rooting at the nodes. The succulent leaves are sessile, opposite decussate, obovate-oblanceolate in shape, 1.0-2.5 cm x 0.4-1.0 cm in size. It is found in damp or marshy areas near streams or on the border of ponds, throughout India.

    COMMON NAMES: Brambhi, Safed Kammi, Jal-Nim & Brami.

    LOCATION: Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana, Bihar, Bengal, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Foot hills of Himachal Pradesh & Uttaranchal.

    PART USED: Whole plant

    SOIL AND CLIMATE
    The plant is known to grow under varying soil and climatic conditions. It grows exceptionally well in poorly drained soils and waterlogged areas under sub-tropical conditions. The plants grow faster at high temperatures (33-400 C) and humidity (65-80%) and should be cultivated as summer-rainy season crop.

    LAND PREPARATION
    The field should be ploughed thoroughly and made free of weeds. The land should be irrigated a day before planting for successful establishment of plant cuttings.

    TRANSPLANTING
    Plant cuttings about 4-5 cm long, each containing a few leaves, nodes and roots are ideal planting materials. These can be obtained by cutting mother plants into small pieces with roots. The cutting are transplanted in wet soil at spacing of 40 cm x 40 cm. Flood irrigation is provided immediately after planting. Ideally, the plants should be transplanted in March-June and allowed to grow and proliferate through hot and humid months of monsoon till September after which harvesting should be done. The plants can also be maintained in a perennial state with two harvests in a year, the first one in June and the other one after monsoon, in October.

    MANURES, FERTILISERS AND PESTICIDES
    The medicinal plants have to be grown without chemical fertilizers and use of pesticides. Organic manures like, Farm Yard Manure (FYM), Vermi-Compost, Green Manure etc. may be used as per requirement of the species. To prevent diseases, bio-pesticides could be prepared (either single or mixture) from Neem (kernel, seeds & leaves), Chitrakmool, Dhatura, Cow's urine etc.

    IRRIGATION
    Irrigation immediately after transplanting is essential for the successful survival of the plants. Subsequently, the fields are irrigated by flooding as per requirement usually every 7-8 days. There is no need for irrigation during the monsoon.

    WEEDING
    Initially hand weeding is required every 5-20 days. Later as the plant proliferate and forms a dense mat of vegetation, weeding may be required sporadically.

    HARVESTING/POST-HARVESTING
    The plants should be harvested between October-November, after that there is loss of plant biomass and bacoside yield. The plant can be ideally harvested by ratooning so that the upper portions of the stem 4-5 cms from the base are removed and the rest left for subsequent regeneration.

    The plants can be dried in a conventional manner by spreading on the ground under shade at room temperature. Alternatively, they can be treated at 800 C in oven for 30 minutes immediately after harvest for a two-fold more retention of bacoside-A content of dried herb. After treatment they can be further air dried by spreading on the ground at room temperature or in the oven at 370 C. The material is to be cleaned free of any external matter. The dry material should be stored in a cool dry room packed in bags/boxes having concrete flooring, away from walls. Precautions also need to be taken to avoid infestation with fungi and insects

    YIELD
    The fresh and dry herb yields of Brahmi go upto 300q/ha and 60/q/ha, respectively, when harvested after September while bacoside-A yield can be as much as 85kg/ha. After the first harvest, 40q dry herb yield from the June harvest, totalling to 100 q dry herb yield in a year will be obtainable.

    ECONOMICS
    Expenditure per hectare Rs.35,000/-
    Gross return @Rs.20/kg of dry
    matter yield Rs.2,00,000/-
    Net income Rs.1,65,000/- (YEAR-2001)

    Note: Market for medicinal plants is volatile and the economics may vary.

    INSTITUTE TO BE CONTACTED:
    HERBAL GARDEN, HERBARIUM & RESEARCH INSTITUTE,
    JOGINDER NAGAR, (GOVT OF H.P. ) SHIMLA.

    CENTRAL INSTITUTE OF MEDICINAL AND
    AROMATIC PLANT (CIMAP), LUCKNOW

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION
    & RESEARCH ,
    SECTOR 67, PHASE-X, SAS NAGAR ,
    MOHALI (PUNJAB).

    For further information u can contact me.

    Regards
    Satya.
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  2. #2 Re: Brahmi- profitable medicinal crop 

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    17
    Dear satyanarayan gupta
    i am lookinmg to culitivate medicinal herba , and i have 'panax ginseng' at sight for themoment, but then i woul dlike your help about more herbs which are profitable or available. i woul dllike to order bulk from you. i have abt 3 acrs of forest land, at an elevation of abt 3000 ft , sikkim. would appreciate your help very much . thank you. yoland.
    Quote Originally Posted by satyanarayan gupta
    Dear Friends,

    Bramhi is one the the most demanded medicinal crop in the world maket.So, here I m giving cultivation aspact of it.

    B.N. BACOPA MONNIERI (L) PENNEL
    FAMILY - SCROPHULARIACEAE

    A creeping succulent herb branches profusely and rooting at the nodes. The succulent leaves are sessile, opposite decussate, obovate-oblanceolate in shape, 1.0-2.5 cm x 0.4-1.0 cm in size. It is found in damp or marshy areas near streams or on the border of ponds, throughout India.

    COMMON NAMES: Brambhi, Safed Kammi, Jal-Nim & Brami.

    LOCATION: Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Haryana, Bihar, Bengal, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Karnataka, Foot hills of Himachal Pradesh & Uttaranchal.

    PART USED: Whole plant

    SOIL AND CLIMATE
    The plant is known to grow under varying soil and climatic conditions. It grows exceptionally well in poorly drained soils and waterlogged areas under sub-tropical conditions. The plants grow faster at high temperatures (33-400 C) and humidity (65-80%) and should be cultivated as summer-rainy season crop.

    LAND PREPARATION
    The field should be ploughed thoroughly and made free of weeds. The land should be irrigated a day before planting for successful establishment of plant cuttings.

    TRANSPLANTING
    Plant cuttings about 4-5 cm long, each containing a few leaves, nodes and roots are ideal planting materials. These can be obtained by cutting mother plants into small pieces with roots. The cutting are transplanted in wet soil at spacing of 40 cm x 40 cm. Flood irrigation is provided immediately after planting. Ideally, the plants should be transplanted in March-June and allowed to grow and proliferate through hot and humid months of monsoon till September after which harvesting should be done. The plants can also be maintained in a perennial state with two harvests in a year, the first one in June and the other one after monsoon, in October.

    MANURES, FERTILISERS AND PESTICIDES
    The medicinal plants have to be grown without chemical fertilizers and use of pesticides. Organic manures like, Farm Yard Manure (FYM), Vermi-Compost, Green Manure etc. may be used as per requirement of the species. To prevent diseases, bio-pesticides could be prepared (either single or mixture) from Neem (kernel, seeds & leaves), Chitrakmool, Dhatura, Cow's urine etc.

    IRRIGATION
    Irrigation immediately after transplanting is essential for the successful survival of the plants. Subsequently, the fields are irrigated by flooding as per requirement usually every 7-8 days. There is no need for irrigation during the monsoon.

    WEEDING
    Initially hand weeding is required every 5-20 days. Later as the plant proliferate and forms a dense mat of vegetation, weeding may be required sporadically.

    HARVESTING/POST-HARVESTING
    The plants should be harvested between October-November, after that there is loss of plant biomass and bacoside yield. The plant can be ideally harvested by ratooning so that the upper portions of the stem 4-5 cms from the base are removed and the rest left for subsequent regeneration.

    The plants can be dried in a conventional manner by spreading on the ground under shade at room temperature. Alternatively, they can be treated at 800 C in oven for 30 minutes immediately after harvest for a two-fold more retention of bacoside-A content of dried herb. After treatment they can be further air dried by spreading on the ground at room temperature or in the oven at 370 C. The material is to be cleaned free of any external matter. The dry material should be stored in a cool dry room packed in bags/boxes having concrete flooring, away from walls. Precautions also need to be taken to avoid infestation with fungi and insects

    YIELD
    The fresh and dry herb yields of Brahmi go upto 300q/ha and 60/q/ha, respectively, when harvested after September while bacoside-A yield can be as much as 85kg/ha. After the first harvest, 40q dry herb yield from the June harvest, totalling to 100 q dry herb yield in a year will be obtainable.

    ECONOMICS
    Expenditure per hectare Rs.35,000/-
    Gross return @Rs.20/kg of dry
    matter yield Rs.2,00,000/-
    Net income Rs.1,65,000/- (YEAR-2001)

    Note: Market for medicinal plants is volatile and the economics may vary.

    INSTITUTE TO BE CONTACTED:
    HERBAL GARDEN, HERBARIUM & RESEARCH INSTITUTE,
    JOGINDER NAGAR, (GOVT OF H.P. ) SHIMLA.

    CENTRAL INSTITUTE OF MEDICINAL AND
    AROMATIC PLANT (CIMAP), LUCKNOW

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION
    & RESEARCH ,
    SECTOR 67, PHASE-X, SAS NAGAR ,
    MOHALI (PUNJAB).

    For further information u can contact me.

    Regards
    Satya.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    kirti s's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    5,188
    Dear Sir

    CULTIVATION
    The two major ginsengs in trade are Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Oriental ginseng), and Panax quinquefolium (American ginseng). There are several minor Oriental ginseng species but not of economic significance. The deciduous aerial stem of ginseng has 3 leaflets in seedlings, 5 leaflets per leaf in mature plants with leaf number correlating with age of the plant. Ginseng plants start to flower in the second year. the flowers of Oriental ginseng as small, 2-3 mm across; sepals 5, green; petals 5, cream yellow, ovate, apex obtuse; stamens 5, filaments, short; pistil 1, ovary inferior, 2 locular; styles 2, united at base; disk cup-shaped. A typical flowering 4-year old American ginseng plant may carry 30-40 berries in an umbel inflorescence with an average of two cream white seeds, 5-6 mm long and 4-5 mm wide, in each berry.

    The ginseng plant has a fleshy taproot which often has two to five laterals and is light yellowish white in color. Dry matter content of the root is about 30%.

    Ginseng is cultivated under artificial shade or simulated forest conditions to meet its requirements of about 30% of full Artificial shade growing is the more common cultivation method worldwide.

    Kirti
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  4. #4  

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    Mar 2005
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    17
    Dear Kirti,
    than k you for the response, i am intersted i oriental giseng, but then the market is volatile now and i cnt get a fix on the price /international & national, can u help?
    thank you .. yoland
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  5. #5  

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    Mar 2005
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    17
    Dear Mr. Gupta,
    thak you for your post, i would be interested to try "bramini" plantation, thak you. regards yoland
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  6. #6 BRAHMI 
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    725
    Dear sir,
    We have alrady started farming of Bacopa monnieri in Orissa,but in small scale due to market problem.This is growing very well in Orissa.We want to cultivate it in large scale if we get any market assurance.Will you please help us for selling out our dried Brahmi products?
    Santanu
    09437066720
    09238501990
    subarnrekha1@yahoo.co.in
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  7. #7 BRAHMI 
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    725
    Dear sir,
    We have alrady started farming of Bacopa monnieri in Orissa,but in small scale due to market problem.This is growing very well in Orissa.We want to cultivate it in large scale if we get any market assurance.Will you please help us for selling out our dried Brahmi products?
    Santanu
    09437066720
    09238501990
    subarnrekha1@yahoo.co.in
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8 BRAHMI 
    Premium Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    725
    Dear sir,
    We have alrady started farming of Bacopa monnieri in Orissa,but in small scale due to market problem.This is growing very well in Orissa.We want to cultivate it in large scale if we get any market assurance.Will you please help us for selling out our dried Brahmi products?
    Santanu
    09437066720
    09238501990
    subarnrekha1@yahoo.co.in
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  9. #9  
    kirti s's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    5,188
    Dear Sir
    Tripti Herbal And Plantation Services, Jabalpur
    Location: S-6, Plot - 958, Seth Sadan, Behind Hotel Arihant Palace, Russel Chowk , Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India, 482 002


    You contact the below for more details



    Kirti
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  10. #10  

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    Mar 2005
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    17
    thnak you kirti, i will get in touch with them.. yoland
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